FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions


CloudCam Setup


  You have reached this page in order to set up your first Ibeyonde IoT device. The setup instructions will accompany your device but in general, all the devices follow same principle. You need to connect to hotspot of the newly acquired device from a smartphone or laptop. The hotspot page will contain information on how to proceed further. The article below describes the setup process of your CloudCam.   The first thing you need to do is register your account at https://app.ibeyonde.com. When you access it for the first time yo, you will not see any device there. Now that you have purchased ibeyonde device, you will add this to your online account. You need to remember your userId and password for your account at app.ibyonde.com for this setup.

Figure 1: CloudCam Parts

 
  When you switch on your CloudCam for the first time, you will see it advertise a hotspot by the name that starts with 'CCam-' and is followed by an id. Connect to this hotspot using your mobile phone or laptop. This is the insecure hotspot, and you do not need to provide any password to connect to it. Once you are connected to the hotspot, you will see the device screen that is popped open on your mobile (android or iOS) phone automatically. It should look like Figure 2.

Figure 2: Popup screen when connected to the hotspot

 
In case your device does not open the default device screen, you need to navigate to http://192.168.97.1 using any of the supported browsers. * Navigate to Wifi Setup from the top menu. To be able to access your account online, you will be setting up the device to connect to your home wifi. This is the home wifi network that you use to connect your laptop and smartphones. You need to have the following information handy to complete the setup.
  1. Wifi credentials: This includes the wifi network name, also called SSID and password. This is the information that you usually give to your mobile phone for it to connect to the home wifi.
  2. Account credentials: These are your account username and password that you have registered at app.ibeyonde.com.
  3. Ip Information: Most of the user need not worry about this. They can select the Auto option, ips are assigned in the background as they are assigned to your mobile phone. For advanced users who familiar with their wifi setup, they can provide the static IP, gateway and netmask.
 

Provide Wifi Credentials


 

Figure 3: Wifi credentials screen

 
 

Provide Account Credentials


Figure 4. Account credentials screen.

 
 

Ip Setup


 

Figure 5. Ip setup screen.

 
  Once the device is configured, I will take about a minute to set the device and link it to the cloud account. At this point, all the indications LEDs should be turned off. The hotspot led should also be turned off. You can now login to your https://app.ibeyonde.com to see your device. Thru the cloud account, you will be able to view video, alerts and inputs from any sensor that is connected. There is much to explore, so get started now!       *Supported browsers are any latest versions of IE, Safari, Chrome and Firefox.  

Introduction

RFID RC522 is a low-cost contactless communication card chip compatible with Raspberry Pi and Arduino. It is based on the MF522-AN module and ready with the RFID antenna built-in. It communicates with Raspberry Pi's SPI interface. MFRC522 supports MIFARE series of high-speed non-contact communication, two-way data transmission rate up to 424kbit/s. It supports rapid CRYPTO1 encryption algorithm, terminology validation MIFARE products. The MF RC522 is a highly integrated transmission module for contactless communication at 13.56 MHz. RC522 supports ISO 14443A/MIFARE mode. This module can fit directly in handheld devices for mass production. The module uses a 3.3V power supply and can communicate directly with any CPU board by connecting through SPI protocol, which ensures reliable work, good reading distance.

RC522 with Raspberry Pi

Enable SPI Interface

On Raspberry Pi, the SPI interface is not enabled by default. We start by turning the SPI interface on by uncommenting #dtparam=spi=on in /boot/config.txt. On reboot you should see the SPI module loaded as shown below:
$lsmod | grep spi

spi_bcm2835 7596 0
spidev 7373 0
You should also see the following SPI devices activated:
$ls /dev/spi*

/dev/spideev0.0   /dev/spidev0.1
 

Loopback test for SPI Interface

Put a wire between MOSI (pin 19) and MISO(pin 21) pins. Then run the following from command line.
$wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/raspberrypi/linux/rpi3.10.y/Documentation/spi/spidev_test.c
$gcc -o spidev_test spidev_test.c
$./spidev_test -D /dev/spidev0.0

spi mode: 0
bits per word: 8
max speed: 500000 Hz (500 KHz)

FF FF FF FF FF FF
40 00 00 00 00 95
FF FF FF FF FF FF
FF FF FF FF FF FF
FF FF FF FF FF FF
DE AD BE EF BA AD
F0 0D
  If you see the above output, you are all set to move further.  

Connect RFID MC522

The pin connection diagram shows how to connect it to Raspberry Pi's header.  
RFID-RC522 connections to Raspberry pi
RFID-RC522 connections to Raspberry pi
 

Install the module that communicates with SPI devices

Install SPI-Py; this lets you interact with the SPI devices. The current state of a repository is not good; that is the reason we will check out a particular commit from it.
$git clone https://github.com/lthiery/SPI-Py.git

$cd SPI-Py

$git checkout 8cce26b9ee6e69eb041e9d5665944b88688fca68

$python setup.py install

Install the interface for RC522

MFRC522-python is a small class to interface with the NFC reader Module MFRC522 on Raspberry Pi. MFRC522-python is a Python port of the example code for NFC Module MF522-AN.
$git clone https://github.com/mxgxw/MFRC522-python.git

$cd MFRC522-python

$pyhton Read.py
  Now swipe the RFID card, and you should see its id getting printed out on console. You can now further customise the code to suit your application. You can buy an RFID MC522 power backed Hat for Raspberry Pi from our store.

Raspberry Pi Sensor Hat Pin Diagram

Following is various labeling used for referring Raspberry Pi set of 20 pins. The sensor hat uses various pins to feed in the sensed data to the raspberry pi.  
Raspberry Pi Pin Labeled Diagram
Raspberry Pi Pin Labeled Diagram
 

DHT22/DHT11, temperature and humidity sensor

  1. BCM pin 22
  2. Physical pin 24

PIR motion sesnor

  1. BCM pin 7
  2. Physical pin 26

Rest button

  1. BCM pin 26
  2. Physical pin 37

I2S Amplifier

  1. DOUT
    1. BCM pin 21
    2. Physical pin 40
  2. LRCL
    1. BCM pin 19
    2. Physical pin 35
  3. Ground
    1. Physical pin 19
  4. 5V
    1. Physical pin 2
  5. BCLK
    1. Physical pin 12
    2. BCM pin 12

I2S Mircophone

  1. DIN
    1. BCM pin 20
    2. Physical pin 38
  2. LRCL
    1. BCM pin 19
    2. Physical pin 35
  3. Ground
    1. Physical pin 19
  4. 3V
    1. Physical pin 1
  5. BCLK
    1. Physical pin 12
    2. BCM pin 12
 
You can replace the sd card in a couple of minutes. Here is the video link for better understanding

Introduction

Raspberry Pi is capable of doing serial communication using the GPIO pins 14 and 15. Setting Raspberry Pi Serial Ports is expected to be simple and straightforward. Instead, it is confusing because online instructions are not very clear on the issues that one encounters when using different Raspberry Pi models. Following article is an attempt to set up the serial communication from your Raspberry Pi. To make it crystal clear, here we are talking about the physical serial pins 8, TxD, also referred to as BCM 14 and physical pin 9, RxD also referred to as BCM 15. Another vital thing to note here is that these serial pins work at 0-3.3 Volts. While connecting it to external devices ensure that they also are 0-3.3V devices. Note that TxD or Raspberry pi connects to RxD of the external device and similarly for the other pins. These pins collectively are also known as UART(Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter) pins.

Raspberry Pi UART

Raspberry Pi has two in-built UART, which are as follows:
  • PL011 UART
  • mini UART
PL011 UART is an ARM-based UART. This UART has better throughput than mini UART. In older versions of Raspberry Pi, the ones that do not have onboard wifi and Bluetooth module, the PL011 UART was allocated to BCM 14 and 15.
Raspberry pi UART pins
Raspberry pi UART pins
In the newer version of Raspberry Pi's the PL011 is connected to the On-board Bluetooth module. By default, Mini UART is available but linked to the core frequency of GPU. This dependency on GPU frequency makes mini UART on newer pi's unstable for most serial applications. The PL011 is a stable and high-performance UART. For better and effective communication use PL011 UART instead of mini UART.

Configure UART on Raspberry Pi

In the section below, we will look at how to configure and use UART ports effectively for both the older and newer versions of Raspberry Pi.

Older version of Raspberry Pi

Following instructions are for Raspberry Pis that do not have onboard Bluetooth module and PL011 UART module is assigned to the BCM pins 14 and 15.

Step 1. Enable kernel UART

Login into the Raspberry Pi and on console edit /boot/config.txt. Look for "enable_uart" configuration. If present change it, if not add it, so that you have following entry in your /boot/config.txt:  enable_uart=1  Step 2. Edit the file cmdline.txt. By default it contains the following:  dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=tty1 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline rootwait  Change the value of console so that it looks like below:  dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=/dev/ttyAMA0,115200 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fsck.repair=yes rootwait  This entry 'console=/dev/ttyAMA0,115200' is only needed if you are connecting a device to access linux console. In case you are connecting it another serial device then completly remove this entry. In case of a serial device also disable the serial console related linux processes: &npsp;
$ sudo systemctl stop serial-getty@ttyAMA0.service
$ sudo systemctl disable serial-getty@ttyAMA0.service
&npsp;

Step 3. Reboot

After a reboot changes take effect and  your serial ports are set to communicate with other serial devices.

Raspberry pi with the onboard Bluetooth module

Following instructions are for Raspberry Pi's that have in-built Bluetooth module using the physical PL011 UART.

Step 1: Disable use of Pl011 UART by Bluetooth module

Login into the Raspberry Pi and on console edit /boot/config.txt. Look for "dtoverlay=pi3-disable-bt" configuration. If present change it, if not add it, so that you have following entry in your /boot/config.txt:  dtoverlay=pi3-miniuart-bt   This step will force the Bluetooth module to use mini UART, and thus become slightly unstable. Also, disable the system services that use the UART module:  sudo systemctl disable hciuart    

Step 2:

Edit the file cmdline.txt.

By default it contains the following:  dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=tty1 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline rootwait  Change the value of console so that it looks like below:  dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=/dev/ttyAMA0,115200 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fsck.repair=yes rootwait  Note that 115200 is the frequency at which the serial communication will happen. Check if this is compatible with the device you are planning to connect.  

Step 3. Reboot

After a reboot changes take effect and your serial ports are set to communicate with other serial devices.

Using serial communication using Raspberry Pi Serial Ports

 
OpenEVSE FTDI Port
OpenEVSE FTDI Port
OpenEVSE FTDI to Raspberry Pi Serial Port
OpenEVSE FTDI to Raspberry Pi Serial Port
      In our case, we intended to connect Raspberry pi to OpenEvse electric vehicle charger on its serial port. The module that speaks UART is shown on the left while the right figure shows the connection via a level shifter to Raspberry Pi.         We are reproducing some python code here that is generic and can help you troubleshoot your serial connection.        

Python code to read from the serial port (read.py):

 
#!/usr/bin/env python
          

import time
import serial


ser = serial.Serial(
    port='/dev/ttyAMA0',
    baudrate = 115200,
    parity=serial.PARITY_NONE,
    stopbits=serial.STOPBITS_ONE,
    bytesize=serial.EIGHTBITS,
    timeout=3
)


while 1:
    x=ser.readline()
    if len(x)>1:
       print x
    time.sleep(2)

Python code to write to the serial port(write.py):

 
#!/usr/bin/env python


import time
import serial


ser = serial.Serial(
    port='/dev/ttyAMA0',
    baudrate = 115200,
    parity=serial.PARITY_NONE,
    stopbits=serial.STOPBITS_ONE,
    bytesize=serial.EIGHTBITS,
    timeout=5
)


while 1:
    var = raw_input(">>: ")
    print "you entered", var.strip()
    ser.write("%s\r"%var)
    time.sleep(2)

Do write to us at info@ibeyonde.com, in case you need more information.
For Upgrade/Update login into your account at http://app.ibeyonde.com. Goto Live menu. Click on the Settings button of the device that you will want to upgrade. This will take you to the device setting page. From this page you can do various operations on your device. Your device needs to be connected to the internet for the operations to go thru to your device. Click on the update button that appears on the device settings page as shown below:
You can configure grid as per your perception of what are the active parts in the view of CCam. When the CCam discovers any motion outside this active grid points it will raise an alarm.
Check item 5 in below picture and you will see the status LEDS. They are deep inside the device and you need to align your eye in from of the pin hole to view there. Status lights indicate the following:
  1. Yellow-Red blinking: The device is booting up. Wait until the device is fully booted to do any operation.
  2. Yellow-green constant: An operation is in progress.
  3. OFF: The device is in Infra mode if the hotspot indicator is OFF or in Hotspot mode if the hotspot indicator is ON.
When you deploy multiple CCam in proximity then they automatically discover each other and form a grid. There is no configuration required and this is done by the cloud software. The grid provides certain smart features like “Events”. The events are collection of snapshots that the machine learning algorithm thinks are linked to each other. This provides a view across cameras for related events.
To configure the CCam you need to set it up in Hotspot mode. When you buy a new CCam it is by default set in Hotspot mode. You can tell if it is in Hotspot mode by looking at the Hotspot indicator. If the indicator is ON the CCam is in Hotspot mode. See below Picture for the location of Hotspot Indicator [see 4 in Pic below]. In case, your CCam does not show the Hotspot indicator ON when you switch it on, then you can press the reset button twice (click-click) to get into this mode. You need to wait for about a minute for your device to boot up and initialize after power on. This mode is similar to the personal hotspot that you create on your mobile phone so that other devices can access the network via your mobile phone. In the case of CCam, this Hotspot is advertised as “CCam-”. You can see the Hotspot listed in your wifi setting page as seen below on a iPhone. It is advertised as CCam-a8da850b.
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